Turn Your Website Into A Web Profit Center
 
Looking Professional To Convince Prospects You're "Legit"

DESIGN TIPS

Here are the key words and phrases that summarize my design philosophy: 

  • Professional
  • Easy to read
  • Simple to understand
  • Pleasing to look at
  • Not jarring to the eyes
You're probably thinking that's pretty standard stuff, but most web sites miss the boat one way or another on these points.  I'll show you what I mean as we go.   First, let's start with perhaps the most important tip of all:

1)  Format the bulk of your sales message to be black text on a white background.   Doing it any other way makes it harder to read, and that misses the whole point.   I'll say it once again:  Put the bulk of your sales message on white (or nearly white) background in black text.  If you don't, you wind up with this: 

How'd you like to read 10 pages of this?   No, really.  Even if it doesn't bother you at first, your eyes will start to fatigue and you'll be straining.  Plus, studies show that people over 35 or 40 are REALLY affected by loud colors, so if you don't want to turn them off, tone it down.
 
How'd you like to read 10 pages of this?   No, really.  Even if it doesn't bother you at first, your eyes will start to fatigue and you'll be straining.  Plus, studies show that people over 35 or 40 are REALLY affected by loud colors, so if you don't want to turn them off, tone it down.
 
A whole page with a subdued background color like this can work, but it has to be a one-color background, not a 'watermark' pattern.  (A watermark is a very faint repeating pattern that makes it hard to read no matter HOW faint it is.)

Sure, you can add colored boxes for effect, add different colored fonts in moderation for effect, etc.  But day in and day out, the majority of your text should be black type on white or very light gray/beige background.

 
WHAT ABOUT INVERTING COLORS?

What about black pages with white text, you ask?  If the web site is more about creating a mood than it is selling products, you can take more liberty, especially if you are marketing to a younger crowd, but if you've got pages and pages of text to present, you're still better off the standard way.

 

2)  Don't be afraid to put a lot of information on one page and have the reader scroll down as they read.  Right now I'm re-working a web site that originally put all their information into bite-sized chunks. . . about 2 paragraphs on every page, then you had to click to the next page.  This is time-consuming and annoying to the reader, and the information wasn't being presented in an interesting manner to begin with.  I streamlined their site and put 7 pages of information into one page - and it's STILL not that long.  Remember, every time you make your reader have to click to the next page, you run the risk of losing them.  - It's just as easy for them to click to a different site.

3)  How you place and break up your paragraphs is very important.  First of all, I rarely let my paragraphs spread from hard-left to hard-right on the screen.   It's easier to read if there are less characters on each line, and giving space on the left and/or right gives the reader a feeling that it's 'light' reading.

You may not be aware of it, but a lot of people just don't like to read if they think it's going to take long.  I think they find it tiresome or boring.  The trick is to deliver your information to them in bite-sized chunks to sort of string them along. 

In this same spirit, you should start new paragraphs every few lines to keep the writing from looking too dense, and pepper your writing with mini-headlines throughout that draw attention to the next topic and make your message easier to digest.

The Importance Of 'Mini' Headlines

Let's see, how can I show you an example of a mini headline?  Oh, I know, look at the line above.  :-)   They really are nifty, and they're easy to use.   Just go through your existing text, create new paragraphs every 3 - 8 lines or so, and insert headlines at will. 

Don't Underestimate This Device!

These mini-headlines effortlessly make your info seem more interesting, more inviting to read, easier to digest, and professional.  Try it, and you'll be surprised how much better it turns out.

4)  Using Pictures

Pictures can add a lot to a web site, but there should be a reason for them.   Avoid stock graphics that you've already seen on lots of other web site.  You want to be different, to stand out. 

I like using professional-looking logos, headlines, and bullets that I make myself instead of plugging in some unrelated picture that doesn't make much sense. 

Additionally avoid spastic animated pictures that distract the reader from reading what you have to say.

Go To Next Chapter


 


Every word, every audio, video, and text file, every image, every pixel is (C) Copyright 2006 by Enlow Enterprises Inc., All Rights Reserved. You may not copy, imitate, or refer to anything on this site without prior written permission of Enlow Enterprises, inc.